Noord Zuid - Netflix

Posted by Editor on Thu 20 June 2019

Noord Zuid gaat over de Amsterdamse rechercheur Dana, gespeeld door Ariane Schluter, die haar achtergrond als psychologe inzet bij het oplossen van misdaden. Na haar scheiding van Wouter, met wie ze 19 jaar getrouwd is geweest, probeert ze samen met haar dochter Roos, een puber van 16, haar privéleven weer vorm te geven. Dana is teamleider van het rechercheteam. In de eerste aflevering wordt Dana geconfronteerd met een dubbele moord. Deze zaak loopt als een rode draad door de serie. Daarnaast worden er per aflevering losse zaken opgelost.

Noord Zuid - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Dutch

Status: Ended

Runtime: 50 minutes

Premier: 2015-01-02

Noord Zuid - North Holland - Netflix

North Holland (Dutch: Noord-Holland [ˌnoːrt ˈɦɔlɑnt] ( listen), West Frisian Dutch: Noard-Holland) is a province of the Netherlands located in the northwestern part of the country. It is situated on the North Sea, north of South Holland and Utrecht, and west of Friesland and Flevoland. In 2015, it had a population of 2,762,163 and a total area of 2,670 km2 (1,030 sq mi). From the 9th to the 16th century, the area was an integral part of the County of Holland. During this period West Friesland was incorporated. In the 17th and 18th century, the area was part of the province of Holland and commonly known as the Noorderkwartier (English: “Northern Quarter”). In 1840, the province of Holland was split into the two provinces of North Holland and South Holland. In 1855, the Haarlemmermeer was drained and turned into land. The capital and seat of the provincial government is Haarlem, and the province's largest city is the Netherlands' capital Amsterdam. The King's Commissioner of North Holland is Johan Remkes, serving since 2010. There are 51 municipalities and three (including parts of) water boards in the province.

Noord Zuid - Emergence of a new province (1795 to 1840) - Netflix

The province of North Holland as it is today has its origins in the period of French rule from 1795 to 1813. This was a time of bewildering changes to the Dutch system of provinces. In 1795, the old order was swept away and the Batavian Republic was established. In the Constitution enacted on 23 April 1798, the old borders were radically changed. The republic was reorganised into eight departments (département) with roughly equal populations. Holland was split up into five departments named “Texel”, “Amstel”, “Delf”, “Schelde en Maas”, and “Rijn”. The first three of these lay within the borders of the old Holland; the latter two were made up of parts of different provinces. In 1801 the old borders were restored when the department of Holland was created. This reorganisation had been short-lived, but it gave birth to the concept of breaking up Holland and making it a less powerful province. In 1807, Holland was reorganised. This time the two departments were called “Amstelland” (corresponding to the modern province of North Holland) and “Maasland” (corresponding to the modern province of South Holland). This also did not last long. In 1810, all the Dutch provinces were integrated into the French Empire. Amstelland and Utrecht were amalgamated as the department of “Zuiderzee” (Zuyderzée in French) and Maasland was renamed “Monden van de Maas” (Bouches-de-la-Meuse in French). After the defeat of the French in 1813, this organisation remained unchanged for a year or so. When the 1814 Constitution was introduced, the country was reorganised as provinces and regions (landschappen). Zuiderzee and Monden van de Maas were reunited as the province of “Holland”. One of the ministers on the constitutional committee (van Maanen) suggested that the old name “Holland and West Friesland” be reintroduced to respect the feelings of the people of that region. This proposal was rejected. However, the division was not totally reversed. When the province of Holland was re-established in 1814, it was given two governors, one for the former department of Amstelland (area that is now North Holland) and one for the former department of Maasland (now South Holland). Even though the province had been reunited, the two areas were still being treated differently in some ways and the idea of dividing Holland remained alive. During this reorganisation the islands of Vlieland and Terschelling were returned to Holland and parts of “Hollands Brabant” (including “Land of Altena”) went to North Brabant. The borders with Utrecht and Gelderland were definitively set in 1820. When the constitutional amendments were introduced in 1840, it was decided to split Holland once again, this time into two provinces called “North Holland” and “South Holland”. The need for this was not felt in South Holland or in West Friesland (which feared the dominance of Amsterdam). The impetus came largely from Amsterdam, which still resented the 1838 relocation of the court of appeal to The Hague in South Holland.

Noord Zuid - References - Netflix