My Family's Crazy Gap Year - Netflix

Posted by Editor on Thu 20 June 2019

Six ordinary British families achieve what many of us dream of, uprooting to travel the globe in search of life-changing experiences. This observational series captures their travels on camera as they swap the day-to-day grind and conventional routines for treks and adventures in exotic and remote corners of the world. Their itineraries are as varied as their budgets, but each parent is equally determined to show their children a way of life far removed from their own, without the usual comforts and luxuries. But what happens when a road trip along the length of Africa results in a car crash involving young children, miles away from medical aid and family support? Or when a daring sea expedition in search of a Pacific island paradise ends in life-threatening food poisoning? Despite the adventures awaiting them, will the intensity of life together 24 hours a day, often in remote destinations and confined spaces, really help these families come together and change?

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2010-09-06

My Family's Crazy Gap Year - Doom Patrol - Netflix

The Doom Patrol is a superhero team appearing in publications from DC Comics. The original Doom Patrol first appeared in My Greatest Adventure

80 (June 1963), and were created by writers Arnold Drake and Bob Haney,

and artist Bruno Premiani. The Doom Patrol has since appeared in multiple incarnations. The first Doom Patrol consisted of super-powered misfits, whose “gifts” caused them alienation and trauma. Dubbed the “World's Strangest Heroes” (an epithet conceived by editor Murray Boltinoff) the original team included The Chief (Niles Caulder), Robotman (Cliff Steele), Elasti-Girl (Rita Farr), and Negative Man (Larry Trainor). The original series was canceled in 1968, when Drake killed the team off in the final issue, Doom Patrol #121 (September–October 1968). Since then, there have been six Doom Patrol series, with Robotman as the only character to appear in all of them.

My Family's Crazy Gap Year - Rachel Pollack's Doom Patrol (volume 2, part 3) - Netflix

Morrison left the book with issue #63, and Rachel Pollack took over writing the book the next issue. Pollack's first issue was also the first under the new Vertigo imprint of DC Comics (although the trade paperback editions of Morrison's work do bear the imprint, the original issues did not). Returning characters for Rachel Pollack's run included Cliff Steele, Niles Caulder (kept alive by the nanobots, but reduced to a disembodied head, usually kept on a tray filled with ice), and Dorothy Spinner. Pollack's run had Dorothy as a primary member of the Patrol; she brought her imaginary friends to her aid in combat. Overall, Pollack's run dealt with issues such as the generation gap, humanity, identity, transgender issues, bisexuality, and borrowed elements from Judaism and Kabbalah in the last few issues. The angel Akatriel is used as a major character in the last four issues. The first story arc of her run was called Sliding In The Wreckage. Cliff's computer brain started to malfunction, and he regressed into flashbacks from previous storylines. Dorothy was haunted by African spirits while dealing with living alone in the real world. The Chief was given a new body by Will Magnus, but to atone for his sins, Caulder ripped his head off the body and was kept in cryogenic storage. Meanwhile, the entire Earth had been suffering from random outbreaks of weirdness, contributed by the arrival of something called “The Book of Ice.” A government agency known as the Builders, similar to the Men from N.O.W.H.E.R.E., were trying to stop the outbreak, which was apparently linked to a race of shapeshifters known as the Teiresias. As the Chief was kept in a cryogenic state, he appeared in the land of the Teiresias as a face carved in a mountain. They warned him that his arrival in this world was causing the craziness in the real world. Throughout the storyline, little people with backwards letters for heads had been seen altering people. These people were apparently older version of nanomachines, referred to as “nannos”. At the DP HQ Builder agents attacked and in the craziness, two of the Teiresias approached Dorothy with a new brain for Cliff, but to insert it she needed the Chief's expertise. In the Teiresias world, nannos “repaired” the Chief so he could live as a severed head. After his awakening, the craziness seemed to stop, and Dorothy, Cliff, and the Chief each realized that they needed to be together. The team relocated to Violet Valley's Rainbow Estates, a house haunted by ghosts of those who died in sexual accidents. There, three new members joined. The Bandage People, George and Marion, who were once two workers for the Builders but managed to escape; and the Inner Child, a manifestation of the ghosts' purity and innocence. Another later newcomer of the team was Kate Godwin, aka Coagula, one of the first transsexual superheroes. A one-time ally of the team called the Identity Addict, who could become different superheroes by shedding her skin like a lizard, integrated herself back into the team while using the False Memory identity to change the team's memories, until she was kicked out by Dorothy. Villains that the team fought, besides the Builders, included the Fox and the Crow, two animal spirits whose feud Dorothy and Cliff were subsequently pulled into; the Master Cleaner, a being with a human fetus inside a bubble for a head who began “cleaning” the world by stripping it down to nothing and replacing the stolen items, including people, with a paper ticket; and a group of Hassidic healers who called themselves the False Healers and their leader, the Rabbi of Darkness. Toward the end of the series, Cliff Steele's brain became entirely robotic, until Dorothy Spinner used her imaginary friends to “repair” it. The Chief would later die after trying to enter the Sephirot or Tree of Life. A new artist, Ted McKeever, took over the artwork for the final 13 issues. Pollack continued writing the title until its cancellation with issue #87, in February 1995.

My Family's Crazy Gap Year - References - Netflix